Katherine York

BORDER INFRASTRUCTURE

SYSTEMATIC LANDSCAPES OF HOMELAND SECURITY

BORDER INFRASTRUCTURE is visual study capturing the 14-mile stretch in San Diego, Calif. that borders Tijuana, Mexico. In the past the only thing that separated this stretch was a single strand of cable. Recently, the United States Congress along with Homeland Security approved the construction of “triple layer fencing” impacting the natural flow of wildlife, nature and water. This fine line creates an evolving culture and landscape of its own.

Beginning in the Pacific Ocean on eastwards, these hundred of miles of physical barriers, high tech infrastructure, check points, minutemen and other security enhancements are combined to reroute the desperate migrants into remote scorching desert land. This honest visual documentation helps to create a consciousness of how our landscapes are manipulated and segregated, compelling the viewer to reconsider their basic assumptions of how we evolve as a society. During the summers of 2011 & 2012, York dedicated time to document this 14-mile border region. The exhibited photos represent the start to this important visual series. York will continue documenting the progression and evolution of Homeland Security’s systematic border infrastructure.

KATHERINE YORK (b. 1976, USA); a photographer based in Berlin, Germany specializing in architectural and ethnographic landscape photography. Profoundly influenced by a turbulent childhood in Detroit, juxtaposed with her passion for architecture and fascination with politics; her photographs are insights into the world she has experienced but is still trying to understand. York documents minimalist landscapes containing current social and political issues and their remnants that appear to be ignored or forgotten. Extensively researching our environment to decode how political & financial power influence the rationality in urban planning, questioning the generally accepted ‘norms’ which often violate our democracy, efficiency and equality. This honest documentation helps to create a consciousness of how our landscapes are manipulated and segregated, compelling the viewer to reconsider their basic assumptions about how we evolve as a society. Viewed as works of art, the photographs embody her personal concerns stemmed from her past and taken from her aesthetic perspective. Viewed as records, York’s photographs reproduce the reality in front of her lens, yielding an unbiased visual report. These images are raw material for an infinite number of messages, which each viewer can independently construct. York is dedicated to her personal projects & working internationally with clients from elite universities to renowned architects.